WANTED: Community Leaders!

If you are reader of the Our Town blog, I bet you love Glenwood Springs, love being “in the know” about the issues facing our town, and want to make a positive impact in our community.  If any of those things are true about you, you really ought to consider applying for the upcoming Glenwood Springs Community Development Academy, a dynamic training program sponsored by the Sonoran Institute and the Glenwood Springs Chamber Resort Association

What would you learn in this program?  Over eight weekly sessions, you will discuss choices and issues facing Glenwood Springs, as well as the role of effective leadership and decision-making in creating successful communities.  Have you ever wondered how transportation-related decisions affect business viability?  Or how housing choices are connected to economic development?  Or what a community can do to nurture leadership and public engagement for sound decision-making?  And what can we as a community be doing RIGHT NOW to address all of these questions?

You will be able to explore these pressing questions (and more!) with regional experts in the Glenwood Springs Community Development Academy. 

The course will take place on Monday nights in Glenwood Springs from 5:30pm – 8:00pm from September 16 to November 4.  The cost for the 8-week course is $100, which includes all materials and catered dinners.  Limited scholarships are available for the course, so don’t let the price tag scare you off if you are interested in participating.

Heads up – class size is limited and applications must be received by 5pm on Friday, September 6.  For further information, please contact Jillian Sutherland at the Sonoran Institute by calling 970-384-4364 extension 4002 or by email at jsutherland@sonoraninstitute.org.

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Participants from the 2012 Garfield County CDA explore redevelopment concepts with Chuck Perry, a nationally-recognized expert in community based planning.

Turn! Turn! Turn!

Apricot Tree in full bloom!
Apricot Tree

Apricot Tree

Some of us remember the song, Turn! Turn! Turn! written by Pete Seeger and made popular by the Byrds in 1965.  The song is based on Ecclesiastes3:1-8 (NIV)

There is a time for everything,
and a season for every activity under the heavens:

    a time to be born and a time to die,
a time to plant and a time to uproot,
    a time to kill and a time to heal,
a time to tear down and a time to build,
    a time to weep and a time to laugh,
a time to mourn and a time to dance,
    a time to scatter stones and a time to gather them,
a time to embrace and a time to refrain from embracing,
    a time to search and a time to give up,
a time to keep and a time to throw away,
    a time to tear and a time to mend,
a time to be silent and a time to speak,
    a time to love and a time to hate,
a time for war and a time for peace.

In my back yard, my fruit trees are blooming and a pair of little finches furiously building a nest above my front door.  My 17-year-old cat stands guard at the door waiting to be allowed outside to bask in the warmth of the sun on our deck. My very shaggy Goldendoodle and Cairn terrier are in desperate need of a clipping to keep them cool. Snow is giving way to rain. Yes, the seasons are changing and I welcome it with open arms.

Change is in the air at City Hall as well.  I welcome a new Mayor, Leo McKinney and thank Matt Steckler for his time while serving as Mayor.  Councilor Steckler continues to serve as a very effective member of City Council.  Both Councilor Steckler and now-Mayor McKinney ran unopposed in April’s election.  Congratulations go out to Stephen Bershenyi, our resident blacksmith, for winning re-election to a second term in City Council against Lyle Beattie.   Mr. Beattie should be commended for stepping up and throwing his hat in the ring.   I hope I am half as engaged and energetic as he is in a few years.  What a dedicated public servant he has been for Glenwood Springs over the years!

Dave Sturges, while willing and capable, did not succeed in his wish to become mayor. Still, he serves a very valuable leadership role on City Council.  While he has been known to pontificate, he brings a balancing opinion to this council. His extensive background and experience serves him well in this role. Besides, he is just a nice guy to talk with.

The remaining three City Council members, not up for re-election this year, continue to serve this community well, if not contentiously.  Todd Leahy and Mike Gamba bring a decidedly conservative perspective.  Both Councilor Leahy and Gamba bring a down-to-earth, realistic view of issues.  They have had the opportunity to see the concerns and issues from a developer/engineer side as well as from the apparently thankless position on the dais. I admire their straight-forward attitude.

Councilor Ted Edmonds is still the most enigmatic of our City Council members to me.  A numbers guy, I am told, he is probably the least loquacious member of Council, but he continues to surprise me.

At any rate – tonight’s City Council meeting had a slightly different tenor. There was a discussion of the Thompson Divide Lease Suspension of which there was unanimous Council support for an Appeal of the BLM decision, prepared by Pitkin County.

Of course the Access Control Plan (ACP) drew much of the usual crowd; John Haines, Karen Price, Hal Sundin, Cheryl Cain, Tony Rosa and Terry Stark.  While many complained that there is still no dialog between Council and the opponents of the ACP and/or the bridge, both Council and the group, most of which are part of the Citizens to Save Grand Avenue (C2SGA) seemed to be amenable to sitting down, possibly over a bowl of spaghetti –with proper public notice of course – and further discussing matters.  Of course there is always the phone – all of the City Council contact information is available on the City’s website:  http://www.cogs.us/council/contact.htm

And Councilor Bershenyi’s Facebook pagehttps://www.facebook.com/pages/Stephen-Bershenyi-City-council-news/485499551498590?fref=ts

And of course – there is this blog – which welcomes comments and guest contributions.

Terry Stark raised a good point – one that I hope to address more satisfactorily than I have in the past – and that is:  Show me the facts that the ACP will help – or at least not damage – the local economy and local businesses.   Stay tuned.

Still there is a call for a Transportation Master plan.  Since I am such a new member of the Transportation Commission, I don’t feel qualified to comment other than to remind everyone that you are welcome to come to the City of Glenwood Springs Transportation Commission meetings.  The next one is Tuesday, May 7th, at 7:30 a.m. in the Engineering Department conference room on the 2nd floor of City Hall.  BYOC (Bring your own coffee . . . I learned that my first meeting . . .)

While I am on the subject of Boards and Commissions – here is a GOLDEN opportunity for you to be involved in your community . . .  The Planning and Zoning Commission is looking for two community members to serve as alternates on the Planning Commission.  We meet monthly and sometimes hold a work session as well.  It does require a commitment of time, but you will be making a valuable contribution to the community!  Contact me at 379-4849 or ktrauger@rof.net if you want more information.

One more reminder – a design charrette (fancy French term for meeting where everyone can comment and participate) for the Confluence area will be held May 21st through 23rd.  This is a very vital piece of our town and your recommendations, input, comments are critical.  More information will be forthcoming shortly.

Stay tuned as well for an update on the Grand Avenue Bridge project . . .

Spring is upon us in Glenwood Springs. And what a glorious time it is!   Here’s to a renewed energy toward cooperation, consensus building and moving forward.  There is a season . . . and a time for everything under Heaven . . .  and our time is now.

Chance to Comment on CDOT’s Guide to Transportation Planning and Programming Public Involvement

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I wanted to pass along a chance to comment on CDOT’s Guide to Transportation Planning and Programming Public Involvement Process.  The following is from CDOT’s website.  I would encourage you to review and submit your comments to Aaron Willis.

http://www.coloradodot.info/programs/statewide-planning/public-involvement.html

Public Involvement

Overview of the Statewide Public Involvement Process

Public participation is a critical element in developing the Regional and Statewide transportation plans. Public participation provides an opportunity for citizens to gain a fundamental understanding of the regional and statewide transportation planning process and participate in long-range transportation plan development.

If you are interested in participating in public involvement activities or having your name added to our mailing list, please e-mail Aaron Willis at aaron.willis@state.co.us and provide us your name, e-mail address and mailing address. Or contact Aaron via phone at: 303-512-4019.

Additional ongoing efforts include STAC meetings and STIP Amendments. Please click on the links to find information regarding these efforts.


Guide to the Transportation Planning and Programming Public Involvement Process

CDOT- Division of Transportation Development has recently developed a Guide to the Transportation Planning and Programming Public Involvement Process. This document is now available for public review and comment period. This document provides overarching public involvement guidance and satisfies the federal requirement that the Department provide a process for public involvement in the development of the long-range statewide transportation plan and the STIP in accordance with §450.210 (2) Code of Federal Regulations.

Please review and provide comments on this documented process. This document is located at the link provided below and a hard copy can be mailed upon request. Comments can be made during the 45-day public comment period using the online comment submission form, e-mail, or mail. All comments are due by June 5, 2013. Please direct any comments or questions to Aaron Willis.

Access the Guide to the Transportation Planning and Programming Public Involvement Process by clicking here.